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SimpliSafeWhole home protection from this well known vendorLow StockSimpliSafe The Essentials$14. 99/mth?Visit Siteat SimpliSafeVariety of starter kitsLarge library of accessoriesHigher end kits aren’t cheapSimpliSafe is a well known brand in the security space. Unlike some other solutions, the company offers five different options for its starter kit. At the low end is the aptly named Foundation Kit, which has a base station, keypad, an entry sensor and a motion sensor, all for $229. At the top end, the Haven Kit, which is priced at $489, includes the same base station and keypad, as well as a key fob, four entry sensors, two motion sensors, a 105dB siren, a panic button, freeze sensor, water sensor, and a smoke detector, which is suitable for a larger home, and obviously protects you from more than just burglary. All kits are backed by a 60 day guarantee – the product can be returned if it does not work out for you – and you have a choice of monitoring plans that include professional monitoring and cellular backup and neither requires a contract. You can sign up for SimpliSafe hereImage credit: HoneywellImage credit: Honeywell6. Honeywell HomeFor exapandable smarthome securitySmarthome capabilitiesAmazon Alexa assistantExapanded rangeHoneywell Smarthome Security is an all in one home security device that is intended to serve as the heart of a smarthome experience. The base unit itself can detect motion and sound, and when its smart sensors are triggered it can record in 1080 HD video. Although the unit has nightvision capability, it can also be connected with smart sensors and Z wave lighting units, to expand its range both inside and outside of your property. It's also compatible with a number of other smarthome devices, which can be configured so that even when you are away, indoor and outdoor lighting can be programmed to simulate someone at home.

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Although there are laws against persecuting whistleblowers who reports something in good faith, and their names are supposed to remain anonymous, this almost never happens. Subsequent to Snowden, another whistleblower, John Crane, came forward supporting the information delivered by Snowden. The irony was that Crane, formerly an assistant inspector general at the Pentagon, was in charge of protecting whistleblowers but when the system failed felt obligated to become one himself. While there was a public outcry after Snowden’s disclosures, there was little change in opinion demonstrated by several poll. In 2006, a NSA surveillance poll indicated that 51 percent of those surveyed found NSA’s surveillance policy to be acceptable while 47 percent found it unacceptable. In a Pew Research poll carried out a month after Snowden’s disclosures although there was some indication that people changed their behavior in terms of electronic security, attitudes about government surveillance remained similar. According to the Pew Research Center:In summary, George Orwell’s novel, 1984, presents what is often considered to be a frightening picture of the use of surveillance data collected by the government. While much of what Orwell seemed to fear has become a reality in today’s world, the current reality of the negative consequences of participatory surveillance far surpasses what Orwell envisioned. Participatory surveillance is engaged in when individuals knowingly allow websites to access personal information entered in profiles and online forms as well as when easily gathered recordings of oneself and others through commonly owned mobile technology. This process is a type of passive permission for others such as insurance companies, marketing firms and service providers to gain access to our online information even when we have some semblance of a reason to believe it will be kept anonymous or private. The novel 1984 was authored by a liberal and objective socialist not long after the Second World War had ended.